Mouse and Keyboard

Using the Crosshair Cursor

T> NMRFx can show two sets of crosshairs. If you're using a 1-button mouse (or the trackpad on a laptop) the mouse moves the black crosshair at first. The red crosshair will appear if you then click at some distance away from the black crosshair. Further actions of clicking and dragging will move whichever crosshair is closest when you click. NMRFx will recognize that you have a 3-button mouse as soon as you click with either the second or third mouse button. Once recognized, the black crosshair will be moved when the left mouse button is down, and the red crosshair when the middle mouse button is down.

To display the crosshairs:

Click the left mouse button with the pointer positioned at the location you want the first crosshair line(s) to appear.

Click the middle mouse button to get the second crosshairs (red).

Status panel displays crosshair positions

As the crosshair lines are moved around the spectrum the status panel is continuously updated with their positions (in PPM). The horizontal distance (in Hz) between the two vertical crosshair lines is also displayed. This can be useful for the manual measurement of couplings. The crosshair positions can be precisely adjusted by typing a value into the status panel entries for each of the crosshair lines. After entering a value, hit the Return key to move the crosshair to the new position. This is useful to, for example, set up expansions of the spectrum.

Key Bindings

You can quickly navigate around spectra and peak-lists using keys on the keyboard. To use this feature the active window must have the "focus", that is, it must be the last window you clicked the mouse in.

Multi-key bindings

Jump To(x,y,z,a) These key sequences allow you to quickly jump the spectrum view to specified plot limits. The jump key sequences start with a j key followed by a letter specifying the axis (x, y, ...) they act on. The behaviour of some of the key patterns differ between the visible axes (x and y) and planes (z, a ...). In the following descriptions, the ? stands for the axis name.

j?VALUE

For axes representing planes (like z), this will jump the view to the spcified plane. If the VALUE has a decimal point (jz117.3), then the value represents a position in ppm. If there is no decimal point (jz32), the value represents a plane number. For visible axes (x and y), the view will jump to be centered on the specified value. Because the number of characters is dependent on the specified value, you need to end the value by pressing the Enter key.

j?b

Jump to the bottom (first) plane. Not allowed for visible axes (x and y).

j?c

Jump to the center plane. Not allowed for visible axes (x and y).

jzf

Set the plot limits (or range of planes) for the specified axis to the full range.

jzm

Jump to the plane that has the maximum intensity at the position of the intersecting black crosshairs. Useful when showing a range of planes to jump to the plane with a visible peak.

jzt

Jump to the top (last) plane. Not allowed for visible axes (x and y).

View The View commands allow quickly changing the spectrum display plot limits.

vc

Center the spectrum at the position of the crosshair. This moves the spectrum view, but doesn't change the overall plot range.

ve

Expand the view to represent the area inside the currently displayed crosshair box.

vf

Change the view to represent the full range of the current dataset.

vi

Zoom the view in (so it shows a smaller region of the dataset, centered on current view center).

vo

Zoom the view out (so it shows a larger region of the dataset, centered on current view center).

vr

Read Limits: Stores into a buffer the current plot limits of the window including the dataset dimensions assigned to each axis, and the chemical shift range displayed on each axis. Does not store parameters such as the assigned dataset, peak lists, colors etc. Use Copy/Paste (see above) for those parameters.

vw

Write Limits: Sets the plot limit parameters of the window to those store to the limits buffer with the read limits command (see above).

Arrow Keys

Use the cursor keys to move up or down planes in 3D and 4D spectra, increment or decrement rows and columns in 1D displays of 2D,3D or 4D spectra, change contour levels, and rotate spectra. These keys are active in both the legacy key binding and new (Extra) key binding modes.

Down Arrow

1Dx: Move up a row. 3D,4D Spectrum: Move Down a plane.

Up Arrow

1Dx: Move down a row. 3D,4D Spectrum: Move Up a plane.

Left Arrow

1Dy: Move left a column. 4D Spectrum: Move Down a Z2 plane.

Right Arrow

1Dy: Move right a column. 4D Spectrum: Move Up a Z2 plane.

Control-Up Arrow

Increase contour level.

Control-Down Arrow

Decrease contour level.

Shift-Right Arrow

Rotates the view of the spectrum by incrementing the dimension displayed on the y axis. For example, for a three-dimensional dataset, if the dataset dimensions displayed on the x, y and z axis are 1, 2 and 3, after this key-action, the dataset dimensions will be 1,3 and 2. Clicking again will rotate the view again, back to dimensions 1,2 and 3. Rotation is around the center of the currently displayed view, so that the new chemical shift of the z axis, is the value that was at the center of the previous y axis.

Shift-Left Arrow

Same as Shift-Right Arrow, but instead the dataset dimension on the y axis is decremented. The direction of rotation only matters if the dataset has more than three dimensions.

Shift-Up Arrow

Rotates the view of the spectrum by incrementing the dimension displayed on the x axis. For example, for a three-dimensional dataset, if the dataset dimensions displayed on the x, y and z axis are 1, 2 and 3, after this key-action, the dataset dimensions will be 3,2 and 1. Clicking again will rotate the view again, back to dimensions 1,2 and 3. Rotation is around the center of the currently displayed view, so that the new chemical shift of the z axis, is the value that was at the center of the previous x axis.

Shift-Down Arrow

Same as Shift-Down Arrow, but instead the dataset dimension on the x axis is decremented. The direction of rotation only matters if the dataset has more than three dimensions.

Trackpads and scroll mice

Use the trackpad and scroll mouse to change display level and pan through the spectrum. Trackpad use has only been tested on a Mac, but may work on other operating systems.

ScrollMouse Wheel

Pan display region of the spectrum up and down.

Control-ScrollMouse Wheel

Scroll the mouse wheel with control key down to increase or decrease the contour display level (2D) or vertical scaling (1D).

TrackPad

Two fingered-swipe on the trackpad will pan the spectrum left/right and up/down with the direction corresponding to the swipe direction.

Control-TrackPad

Two fingered-swipe on the trackpad in the "vertical" direction will increase or decrease (depending on swipe direction) the contour display level (2D) or vertical scaling (1D).